Acquaviva

Populated Place, Latium Provincia di Rieti

Italy

Acquaviva

Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 8: museum gallery Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 8: museum gallery Credit: diffendale

Acquaviva is a small populated place located in the province of Rieti in the Latium region of Italy. Situated in central Italy, Acquaviva is nestled in the picturesque Sabine Hills, offering stunning views of the surrounding countryside.

The village is characterized by its quaint and charming atmosphere, with traditional stone houses and narrow winding streets. The local population is estimated to be around a few hundred residents, creating a tight-knit and close community.

Acquaviva is known for its rich history, dating back to ancient Roman times. The area has been inhabited since prehistoric times, with archaeological finds suggesting human presence as early as the Iron Age. The village itself boasts several historical landmarks, including the Church of San Nicola, which dates back to the 12th century.

The local economy primarily relies on agriculture, with olive groves, vineyards, and wheat fields dotting the landscape. The fertile soil and favorable climate lend themselves to the production of high-quality olive oil and wine, which are renowned throughout the region.

Despite its small size, Acquaviva offers a range of amenities to its residents and visitors. There are a few local shops, cafes, and restaurants where one can enjoy authentic Italian cuisine. The village also hosts various cultural and social events throughout the year, including festivals celebrating local traditions and customs.

Overall, Acquaviva is a charming and idyllic village that offers a peaceful and authentic Italian experience, combining rich history, stunning landscapes, and a warm and welcoming community.

Have you been to Acquaviva? Tell us in the comments section below.

Acquaviva Images

Images are sourced within 20km of lat/long (42.41871/12.67416).

Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 8: museum gallery Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 8: museum gallery
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 7: info panel Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 7: info panel
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 1: side A Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 1: side A
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 4: side C Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 4: side C
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 5: sides B and A Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 5: sides B and A
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 3: sides A and C Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 3: sides A and C
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 6: side B Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 6: side B
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
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Acquaviva is a populated place in Latium, Italy. It has a population of 14 and an elevation of 442 meters above sea level. It is also known as Acquaviva. Information correct as at Monday 14th April 2014.

What 3 Words

///flatten.buttoned.neighed. Near Cottanello, Latium

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Nearby Amenities

Located within 500m of 42.41871,12.67416
Acqua Viva
Place: hamlet
Lat/Long: 42.4185755/12.6746156
Acqua Viva
Traffic Sign: city_limit
Lat/Long: 42.4177672/12.6745808
Power: tower
Lat/Long: 42.414808/12.6734604
Power: tower
Lat/Long: 42.4168634/12.6715346
The data included in this document is from www.openstreetmap.org. The data is made available under ODbL.
 

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