Acquaviva

Populated Place, Latium Provincia di Frosinone

Italy

Acquaviva

Vespa nei vicoli Chi non vespa più e si fa le pere (cit.)
Vespa nei vicoli Credit: Vincenzo Elviretti

Acquaviva is a small town located in the Provincia di Frosinone in Latium, Italy. The town is situated on the banks of the Liri River, and is surrounded by rolling hills and lush valleys. It has a population of around 1,500 and is known for its traditional culture and charming atmosphere.

The town's most notable attraction is its medieval castle, which was built in the 12th century. The castle is beautifully preserved and offers visitors a glimpse into the town's history. Nearby, visitors can find the Chiesa Madre, an old baroque church built in the 17th century, as well as the remains of a Roman amphitheater.

Acquaviva is also home to many Italian festivals, including the annual Festival della Camomilla, which celebrates the local production of chamomile tea. During the festival, locals offer chamomile tea to visitors, as well as traditional dishes such as risotto, pasta, and meats.

Although Acquaviva is a relatively small town, it has several restaurants, cafes, and bars, as well as a few small shops. Visitors can also find hiking paths and cycling routes around the town to explore the surrounding countryside.

Acquaviva is a great place to visit for those looking to experience traditional Italian culture and small-town charm. The town offers a unique blend of history, culture, and natural beauty, and is sure to be a memorable experience.

Have you been to Acquaviva? Tell us in the comments section below.

Acquaviva Images

Images are sourced within 20km of lat/long (41.63353/13.21259).

Vespa nei vicoli Chi non vespa più e si fa le pere (cit.)
Vespa nei vicoli
Chi non vespa più e si fa le pere (cit.)
L'uragano "... Ecco l'unico fatto che possa compensarmi
Di non essere io l'uragano..."
Massimo Volume
L'uragano
"... Ecco l'unico fatto che possa compensarmi Di non essere io l'uragano..." Massimo Volume
2024-03-03 Pompeii-Rome Italy P8P (30) March 3, 2024 - Pompei-Rome, Italy - day 10 - picture on/from the high speed train as we traveled from Naples to Rome (Termini Station). - Apparently they are removing this mountain...
2024-03-03 Pompeii-Rome Italy P8P (30)
March 3, 2024 - Pompei-Rome, Italy - day 10 - picture on/from the high speed train as we traveled from Naples to Rome (Termini Station). - Apparently they are removing this mountain...
2024-03-03 Pompeii-Rome Italy P8P (28) March 3, 2024 - Pompei-Rome, Italy - day 10 - picture on/from the high speed train as we traveled from Naples to Rome (Termini Station).
2024-03-03 Pompeii-Rome Italy P8P (28)
March 3, 2024 - Pompei-Rome, Italy - day 10 - picture on/from the high speed train as we traveled from Naples to Rome (Termini Station).
Alatri, Civita, 2: Porta Maggiore Alatri, the ancient <i>Aletrium</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432664" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>)
The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 2: Porta Maggiore
Alatri, the ancient Aletrium (see on Pleiades) The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 3: Porta Maggiore, detail of lintel Alatri, the ancient <i>Aletrium</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432664" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>)
The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 3: Porta Maggiore, detail of lintel
Alatri, the ancient Aletrium (see on Pleiades) The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 4: Porta Maggiore, detail Alatri, the ancient <i>Aletrium</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432664" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>)
The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 4: Porta Maggiore, detail
Alatri, the ancient Aletrium (see on Pleiades) The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 6: topo marker Alatri, the ancient <i>Aletrium</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432664" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>)
The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 6: topo marker
Alatri, the ancient Aletrium (see on Pleiades) The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 7 Alatri, the ancient <i>Aletrium</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432664" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>)
The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 7
Alatri, the ancient Aletrium (see on Pleiades) The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 5: topo marker in context Alatri, the ancient <i>Aletrium</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432664" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>)
The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Alatri, Civita, 5: topo marker in context
Alatri, the ancient Aletrium (see on Pleiades) The limestone polygonal masonry walls of the acropolis (the so-called Civita), seen here, are tentatively dated to the 4th-3rd c. BCE (if anything, they are more likely to be more recent than to be older).
Cannata from Pontecorvo in Alatri, 3 (reverse) Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE
The <i>cannata</i> was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of this vase identifies it as a product of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate.

In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo Civico di Alatri, sezione Demo-EtnoAntropologica
Cannata from Pontecorvo in Alatri, 3 (reverse)
Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE The cannata was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of this vase identifies it as a product of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate. In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo Civico di Alatri, sezione Demo-EtnoAntropologica
Cannata from Pontecorvo in Alatri, 2 Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE
The <i>cannata</i> was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of this vase identifies it as a product of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate.

In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo Civico di Alatri, sezione Demo-EtnoAntropologica
Cannata from Pontecorvo in Alatri, 2
Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE The cannata was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of this vase identifies it as a product of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate. In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo Civico di Alatri, sezione Demo-EtnoAntropologica
Cannata from Pontecorvo in Pastena, 1 Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE
The <i>cannata</i> was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of this vase identifies it as a product of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate.

In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo della Civiltà Contadina e dell'Ulivo di Pastena
Cannata from Pontecorvo in Pastena, 1
Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE The cannata was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of this vase identifies it as a product of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate. In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo della Civiltà Contadina e dell'Ulivo di Pastena
Two cannate from Pontecorvo Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE
The <i>cannata</i> was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of these vases identifies them as products of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate.

In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo della Civiltà Contadina e dell'Ulivo di Pastena
Donation of Rita Sarracino
Two cannate from Pontecorvo
Ca. 19th-mid 20th c. CE The cannata was used principally for carrying and dispensing water. The form and decoration of these vases identifies them as products of the town of Pontecorvo, formerly known as a center for ceramic production. As of 2024, there is only a single potter still making cannate. In the collection of, and photographed on display at, the Museo della Civiltà Contadina e dell'Ulivo di Pastena Donation of Rita Sarracino
Roman villa at Casale di Madonna del Piano, Castro dei Volsci (1) Castro dei Volsci (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432770" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>; potentially to identified as the ancient Satricum of the Volsci [<a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/438827" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>])

The villa has a long history, spanning from the Roman Late Republican period, 1st c. BCE, through the Roman Imperial period in the 1st-3rd c. CE, into Late Antiquity and the Early Medieval period, with the arrival of the Lombards in the 6th c. CE. Between the 5th and 6th c. CE an apsed church building was inserted into the plan of the villa. Occupation ceased in the 8th or 9th c. CE following a destruction by fire.
Roman villa at Casale di Madonna del Piano, Castro dei Volsci (1)
Castro dei Volsci (see on Pleiades; potentially to identified as the ancient Satricum of the Volsci [Pleiades]) The villa has a long history, spanning from the Roman Late Republican period, 1st c. BCE, through the Roman Imperial period in the 1st-3rd c. CE, into Late Antiquity and the Early Medieval period, with the arrival of the Lombards in the 6th c. CE. Between the 5th and 6th c. CE an apsed church building was inserted into the plan of the villa. Occupation ceased in the 8th or 9th c. CE following a destruction by fire.
Roman villa at Casale di Madonna del Piano, Castro dei Volsci (2) Castro dei Volsci (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432770" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>; potentially to identified as the ancient Satricum of the Volsci [<a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/438827" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>])

The villa has a long history, spanning from the Roman Late Republican period, 1st c. BCE, through the Roman Imperial period in the 1st-3rd c. CE, into Late Antiquity and the Early Medieval period, with the arrival of the Lombards in the 6th c. CE. Between the 5th and 6th c. CE an apsed church building was inserted into the plan of the villa. Occupation ceased in the 8th or 9th c. CE following a destruction by fire.
Roman villa at Casale di Madonna del Piano, Castro dei Volsci (2)
Castro dei Volsci (see on Pleiades; potentially to identified as the ancient Satricum of the Volsci [Pleiades]) The villa has a long history, spanning from the Roman Late Republican period, 1st c. BCE, through the Roman Imperial period in the 1st-3rd c. CE, into Late Antiquity and the Early Medieval period, with the arrival of the Lombards in the 6th c. CE. Between the 5th and 6th c. CE an apsed church building was inserted into the plan of the villa. Occupation ceased in the 8th or 9th c. CE following a destruction by fire.
2024-03-03 Pompeii-Rome Italy P8P (34) March 3, 2024 - Pompei-Rome, Italy - day 10 - picture on/from the high speed train as we traveled from Naples to Rome (Termini Station).
2024-03-03 Pompeii-Rome Italy P8P (34)
March 3, 2024 - Pompei-Rome, Italy - day 10 - picture on/from the high speed train as we traveled from Naples to Rome (Termini Station).
Roman villa at Casale di Madonna del Piano, Castro dei Volsci (3) Castro dei Volsci (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/432770" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>; potentially to identified as the ancient Satricum of the Volsci [<a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/438827" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>])

The villa has a long history, spanning from the Roman Late Republican period, 1st c. BCE, through the Roman Imperial period in the 1st-3rd c. CE, into Late Antiquity and the Early Medieval period, with the arrival of the Lombards in the 6th c. CE. Between the 5th and 6th c. CE an apsed church building was inserted into the plan of the villa. Occupation ceased in the 8th or 9th c. CE following a destruction by fire.
Roman villa at Casale di Madonna del Piano, Castro dei Volsci (3)
Castro dei Volsci (see on Pleiades; potentially to identified as the ancient Satricum of the Volsci [Pleiades]) The villa has a long history, spanning from the Roman Late Republican period, 1st c. BCE, through the Roman Imperial period in the 1st-3rd c. CE, into Late Antiquity and the Early Medieval period, with the arrival of the Lombards in the 6th c. CE. Between the 5th and 6th c. CE an apsed church building was inserted into the plan of the villa. Occupation ceased in the 8th or 9th c. CE following a destruction by fire.
Show me another place!

Acquaviva is a populated place in Latium, Italy. It has a population of 18 and an elevation of 240 meters above sea level. It is also known as Acquaviva. Information correct as at Monday 14th April 2014.

What 3 Words

///reap.sake.asserted. Near Cerquotti-Madonna del Piano, Latium

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Located within 500m of 41.63353,13.21259
Fixme: continue
Lat/Long: 41.6345718/13.2111686
The data included in this document is from www.openstreetmap.org. The data is made available under ODbL.
 

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