Acquaviva

Populated Place, Latium Città metropolitana di Roma Capitale

Italy

Acquaviva

exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma" Installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501.
<a href="https://porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-roma2" rel="noreferrer nofollow">porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...</a>
exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma" Credit: diffendale

Acquaviva is a small populated place located in the Città metropolitana di Roma Capitale, which is a metropolitan city in the region of Latium, Italy. It is situated in central Italy, approximately 30 kilometers northeast of the city of Rome.

The town of Acquaviva is known for its picturesque landscape and charming atmosphere. Surrounded by rolling hills and lush greenery, it offers a peaceful escape from the bustling city life of Rome. The town is characterized by its traditional Italian architecture, with colorful houses lining the narrow streets.

Acquaviva has a small population, estimated to be around a few hundred residents. It is a close-knit community where locals are known for their warmth and hospitality. The town has a charming town square, where locals gather for socializing and community events.

The main economic activities in Acquaviva are agriculture and small-scale businesses. The fertile lands surrounding the town are used for cultivating crops such as olives, grapes, and vegetables. Some residents also work in nearby cities or commute to Rome for employment opportunities.

Despite its small size, Acquaviva is rich in history and cultural heritage. It has a few notable landmarks, including a medieval church and a historical fountain. The town also hosts various cultural events and festivals throughout the year, showcasing local traditions and customs.

Overall, Acquaviva is a peaceful and idyllic town that offers a glimpse into the authentic Italian countryside. Its natural beauty, friendly community, and rich history make it a charming destination for visitors seeking a tranquil retreat.

Have you been to Acquaviva? Tell us in the comments section below.

Acquaviva Images

Images are sourced within 20km of lat/long (42.16389/12.74313).

exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma" Installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501.
<a href="https://porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-roma2" rel="noreferrer nofollow">porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...</a>
exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma"
Installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501. porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...
Roman terracotta veiled female half head from Fidenae Roman Mid-Republican period, mid-3rd c. BCE
Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/422923" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, votive deposit 70

Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501.
<a href="https://porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-roma2" rel="noreferrer nofollow">porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...</a>
Roman terracotta veiled female half head from Fidenae
Roman Mid-Republican period, mid-3rd c. BCE Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on Pleiades), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, votive deposit 70 Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501. porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 7 Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE
Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/422923" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, <i>mansio</i>

Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient <i>mansio</i>, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two <i>cubicula</i> (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures.

Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501.
<a href="https://porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-roma2" rel="noreferrer nofollow">porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...</a>
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 7
Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on Pleiades), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, mansio Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient mansio, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two cubicula (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures. Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501. porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 3 Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE
Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/422923" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, <i>mansio</i>

Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient <i>mansio</i>, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two <i>cubicula</i> (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures.

Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501.
<a href="https://porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-roma2" rel="noreferrer nofollow">porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...</a>
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 3
Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on Pleiades), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, mansio Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient mansio, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two cubicula (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures. Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501. porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 2 Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE
Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/422923" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, <i>mansio</i>

Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient <i>mansio</i>, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two <i>cubicula</i> (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures.

Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501.
<a href="https://porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-roma2" rel="noreferrer nofollow">porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...</a>
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 2
Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on Pleiades), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, mansio Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient mansio, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two cubicula (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures. Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501. porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 4: detail of ithyphallic mule laden with amphorae Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE
Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/422923" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, <i>mansio</i>

Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient <i>mansio</i>, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two <i>cubicula</i> (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures.

Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501.
<a href="https://porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-roma2" rel="noreferrer nofollow">porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...</a>
Roman bichrome mosaics from a mansio at Fidenae, 4: detail of ithyphallic mule laden with amphorae
Roman Imperial period, late 2nd c. CE Found in the territory of ancient Fidenae (see on Pleiades), during construction of the Galleria Commerciale Porta di Roma, Via Carmelo Bene, site 109, mansio Work for the construction of the Porta di Roma shopping mall led to the discovery of a building identified as an ancient mansio, or post station, destined to the lodging and feeding of travelers. The structure was built in the Mid-Imperial period, at the end of the 2nd c. CE, and continued in use through the 4th c. CE. The portion interpreted as the hostelry was paved with figural black-and-white mosaics, the larger from the atrium and the smaller two from the two cubicula (bedrooms), with a chained dog in the entryway. The larger atrium mosaic represents a Nilotic scene with Pygmies engaged in various activities. The cubicula mosaics, much reconstructed, are decorated with sea creatures. Photographed on display in the permanent exhibition "Fidenae alla Porta di Roma," installed in the Porta di Roma mall, in collaboration with the Soprintendenza Speciale Archeologia Belle Arti e Paesaggio di Roma and H501. porta-di-roma.klepierre.it/servizi/fidenae-alla-porta-di-...
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 8: museum gallery Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 8: museum gallery
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 7: info panel Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 7: info panel
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 1: side A Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE
Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient <i>Cures</i> (see on <a href="https://pleiades.stoa.org/places/413114" rel="noreferrer nofollow">Pleiades</a>), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982.

The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in <i>Imagines Italicae</i>; <i>ST</i> Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument.

The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique.

For more information, see the museum's site on the stone:
<a href="https://www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#" rel="noreferrer nofollow">www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/#</a>

Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Cures cippus (Cippo di Cures), 1: side A
Late Archaic period, ca. late 6th c. BCE Found in the territory of Fara in Sabina, the territory of ancient Cures (see on Pleiades), north of the ancient center, in the bed of the Farfa torrent, in 1982. The cippus is a fragment of an originally larger limestone stele, and bears the remains of two separate inscriptions (Sabini / CVRES 1 and 2 in Imagines Italicae; ST Sp RI 1), both Sabine(?)/Paleo-Sabellic texts in the South Picene alphabet. The first inscription covered three sides (B, A, C) of the stele, and although highly fragmentary can be interpreted as a tomb marker. The second inscription reused the front side (A) of the stele, after this had been erased, and also seems to refer to itself as a tomb monument. The only Paleo-Sabellic inscription thus far found on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennines, the stele presents a paleographic innovation borrowed from nearby writers of Etruscan: the text returns at the beginning of each line, rather than following the earlier boustrophedon technique. For more information, see the museum's site on the stone: www.museofarainsabina.it/cippo-di-cures/# Photographed on display in the Museo Archeologico Fara in Sabina (provincia di Rieti, Lazio, Italy)
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
Village Flaminio Bungalow Park
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Acquaviva is a populated place in Latium, Italy. It has a population of 758 and an elevation of 217 meters above sea level. It is also known as Acquaviva. Information correct as at Sunday 13th April 2014.

What 3 Words

///intellectual.professes.sidebar. Near Montelibretti, Latium

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Nearby Amenities

Located within 500m of 42.16389,12.74313
Fuel
Monteshell
Brand: Q8
Operator: Servizi & Gestioni Italia S.R.L.
Ref Mise: 11806
Lat/Long: 42.1653478/12.7472922
Le Molinare
Addr City: Nerola
Addr Housenumber: 4
Addr Postcode: 00017
Addr Street: Via Maremmana
Opening Hours: Mo-Sa 05:30-13:00,16:30-19:30
Operator: Molino e Vapoforno Tancredi
Shop: bakery
Website: http://www.lemolinare.it
Lat/Long: 42.1633389/12.7423516
Acquaviva
Ele: 220
Place: village
Population: 758
Lat/Long: 42.1636895/12.7435567
Alimentari
Addr City: Acquaviva
Addr Street: Via Salaria Vecchia
Shop: convenience
Lat/Long: 42.1630355/12.7410497
Fast Food
Mai Dire Pizza
Addr City: Acqaviva
Addr Housenumber: 72
Addr Postcode: 00017
Addr Street: Via Salaria Vecchia
Cuisine: pizza
Lat/Long: 42.1650422/12.7473982
Cafe
Caffe' Giulio Cesare
Addr City: Acqaviva
Addr Housenumber: 74
Addr Postcode: 00017
Addr Street: Via Salaria Vecchia
Lat/Long: 42.1651037/12.7474828
Carrefour Express
Addr City: Acquaviva
Addr Postcode: 00017
Addr Street: Via Salaria Vecchia
Brand: Carrefour Express
Brand Wikidata: Q2940190
Brand Wikipedia: fr:Carrefour Express
Shop: convenience
Lat/Long: 42.1633294/12.7432531
Restaurant
Il Giardino
Addr City: Acquaviva
Addr Housenumber: 109
Addr Postcode: 00017
Addr Street: Via Salaria Vecchia
Phone: +39 0774 640140
Lat/Long: 42.1638174/12.7429585
The data included in this document is from www.openstreetmap.org. The data is made available under ODbL.
 

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