Kudyat an Naşārá

Populated Place, Asyut

Egypt

Kudyat an Naşārá

Soldiers, Tomb of Ahmose, Amarna The Nobles' Tombs in the northern cliffs of Amarna are some of the best preserved and most rewarding features surviving at the site of Akhetaten. The decoration is better preserved on the whole and reveals much about life during the Amarnan revolution.

Tell el Amarna is the site of something unique in Egypt's history, the brand new capital city by the 'heretic' pharaoh Amenophis IV, better known by the name Akhenaten. Today little remains of the ancient city beyond its foundations (largely hidden amidst the sand dunes), but its significance makes it one of the country's most important archaeological sites.

Akhenaten's reign is marked by a radical break with Egypt's ancient religion, the pharaoh abandoned the multitude of traditional gods in favour of a single deity, the Aten, the life giving sun-disc. A new city was built on a desert site, chosen for its proximity to a geographical feature that appeared to enfold the rising sun, and established to cement Egypt's revolution away from the priests and cult centre of Thebes. The city was named 'Akhetaten' and served as the cult centre of the pharoah's new religion with himself as the chief intermediary of the new god. Akhenaten is often celebrated as one of history's earliest monotheistic rulers. 

The city had a short life, as did Akhenaten's new religion, with the traditional order and power base restored following his death under the reign of his son Tutankhaten (better known as Tutankhamun, the name he adopted after abandoning the Atenist religion). The site was plundered for materials over the following decades and little remains visible beyond the tombs carved into the nearby cliffs. 

The palaces and the once great temple of Aten have all but disappeared, though two columns of the nearby small temple have been reconstructed in recent years. The desolate nature of the site has however preserved much of the city's layout, since unlike most ancient Egyptian settlements it remained uninhabited over the millennia.

For more on this intriguing site see below:-
<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna" rel="nofollow">en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna</a>
Soldiers, Tomb of Ahmose, Amarna Credit: Aidan McRae Thomson

Kudyat an Nasara is a populated place located in the Asyut Governorate of Egypt. It is situated approximately 27 kilometers south of the city of Asyut and is surrounded by agricultural fields and small villages. The village is home to a predominantly Coptic Christian population, with a few Muslim families residing in the area as well.

The village has a small market area where locals can purchase basic necessities, and there are also a few small shops and cafes. The main source of income for the villagers is agriculture, with many individuals working in nearby fields and farms.

Kudyat an Nasara is known for its ancient Coptic church, which dates back to the 8th century. The church is dedicated to St. George and is said to contain some of the oldest Christian artifacts in Egypt. It is a popular destination for both locals and tourists interested in the history of Christianity in Egypt.

Despite its small size and rural location, Kudyat an Nasara is an important cultural and historical site in Egypt. Its unique blend of Coptic and Islamic traditions and its rich agricultural heritage make it a fascinating and important part of Egypt's cultural landscape.

Have you been to Kudyat an Naşārá? Tell us in the comments section below.

Kudyat an Naşārá Images

Images are sourced within 20km of lat/long (27.53333/30.75).

Soldiers, Tomb of Ahmose, Amarna The Nobles' Tombs in the northern cliffs of Amarna are some of the best preserved and most rewarding features surviving at the site of Akhetaten. The decoration is better preserved on the whole and reveals much about life during the Amarnan revolution.

Tell el Amarna is the site of something unique in Egypt's history, the brand new capital city by the 'heretic' pharaoh Amenophis IV, better known by the name Akhenaten. Today little remains of the ancient city beyond its foundations (largely hidden amidst the sand dunes), but its significance makes it one of the country's most important archaeological sites.

Akhenaten's reign is marked by a radical break with Egypt's ancient religion, the pharaoh abandoned the multitude of traditional gods in favour of a single deity, the Aten, the life giving sun-disc. A new city was built on a desert site, chosen for its proximity to a geographical feature that appeared to enfold the rising sun, and established to cement Egypt's revolution away from the priests and cult centre of Thebes. The city was named 'Akhetaten' and served as the cult centre of the pharoah's new religion with himself as the chief intermediary of the new god. Akhenaten is often celebrated as one of history's earliest monotheistic rulers. 

The city had a short life, as did Akhenaten's new religion, with the traditional order and power base restored following his death under the reign of his son Tutankhaten (better known as Tutankhamun, the name he adopted after abandoning the Atenist religion). The site was plundered for materials over the following decades and little remains visible beyond the tombs carved into the nearby cliffs. 

The palaces and the once great temple of Aten have all but disappeared, though two columns of the nearby small temple have been reconstructed in recent years. The desolate nature of the site has however preserved much of the city's layout, since unlike most ancient Egyptian settlements it remained uninhabited over the millennia.

For more on this intriguing site see below:-
<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna" rel="nofollow">en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna</a>
Soldiers, Tomb of Ahmose, Amarna
The Nobles' Tombs in the northern cliffs of Amarna are some of the best preserved and most rewarding features surviving at the site of Akhetaten. The decoration is better preserved on the whole and reveals much about life during the Amarnan revolution. Tell el Amarna is the site of something unique in Egypt's history, the brand new capital city by the 'heretic' pharaoh Amenophis IV, better known by the name Akhenaten. Today little remains of the ancient city beyond its foundations (largely hidden amidst the sand dunes), but its significance makes it one of the country's most important archaeological sites. Akhenaten's reign is marked by a radical break with Egypt's ancient religion, the pharaoh abandoned the multitude of traditional gods in favour of a single deity, the Aten, the life giving sun-disc. A new city was built on a desert site, chosen for its proximity to a geographical feature that appeared to enfold the rising sun, and established to cement Egypt's revolution away from the priests and cult centre of Thebes. The city was named 'Akhetaten' and served as the cult centre of the pharoah's new religion with himself as the chief intermediary of the new god. Akhenaten is often celebrated as one of history's earliest monotheistic rulers. The city had a short life, as did Akhenaten's new religion, with the traditional order and power base restored following his death under the reign of his son Tutankhaten (better known as Tutankhamun, the name he adopted after abandoning the Atenist religion). The site was plundered for materials over the following decades and little remains visible beyond the tombs carved into the nearby cliffs. The palaces and the once great temple of Aten have all but disappeared, though two columns of the nearby small temple have been reconstructed in recent years. The desolate nature of the site has however preserved much of the city's layout, since unlike most ancient Egyptian settlements it remained uninhabited over the millennia. For more on this intriguing site see below:- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna
Ägypten 1999 (544) Flug von Luxor nach Kairo Irgendwo über Ägypten
Ägypten 1999 (544) Flug von Luxor nach Kairo
Irgendwo über Ägypten
Tombs at Meir
Tombs at Meir
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir
Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir
Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind this tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir
Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind this tomb.
Tuna el Gebel - Astronomical ceiling This painted ceiling is one of the few to show astronomical themes.
Tuna el Gebel - Astronomical ceiling
This painted ceiling is one of the few to show astronomical themes.
Investigating Hermopolis At the Temple of Domitianus. There is a royal cartouche on that rock but it is upside down, and hence so is Ilona.
Investigating Hermopolis
At the Temple of Domitianus. There is a royal cartouche on that rock but it is upside down, and hence so is Ilona.
Ilona points out the Great Palace
Ilona points out the Great Palace
Ilona tries to locate the Large Aton Temple
Ilona tries to locate the Large Aton Temple
Tomb of Meryra, Amarna Bianca gives her presentation inside tomb of Meryra, Amarna.
Tomb of Meryra, Amarna
Bianca gives her presentation inside tomb of Meryra, Amarna.
Bianca presents outside the Northern Tombs, Amarna
Bianca presents outside the Northern Tombs, Amarna
Walking from Stone Village A 20-minute walk to and from the bus through the desert.
Walking from Stone Village
A 20-minute walk to and from the bus through the desert.
Anna Stevens, Egypt Exploration Society Field director at the Stone Village excavation
Anna Stevens, Egypt Exploration Society
Field director at the Stone Village excavation
Climbing to Stela U These boundary stelae marked the outer limits of Akhetaton, Akhenaten's new capital city.
Climbing to Stela U
These boundary stelae marked the outer limits of Akhetaton, Akhenaten's new capital city.
Stela U For the hieroglyphics readers among you.
Stela U
For the hieroglyphics readers among you.
Stone village excavation, Amarna Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Stone village excavation, Amarna
Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Stone village excavation, Amarna Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Stone village excavation, Amarna
Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Show me another place!

Kudyat an Naşārá is a populated place in Asyut, Egypt. It has an elevation of 46 meters above sea level. It is also known as Kudyat an Nasara, Kudyat an Naşārá, Kudyet el Nasara, Kudyet en Nasara, Kudyet en Naṣâra. Information correct as at Thursday 19th January 2012.

What 3 Words

///repaving.clouds.toughening. Near Dayrūţ, Asyut

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