Nazlat Bāwīţ

Populated Place, Asyut

Egypt

Where is Nazlat Bāwīţ?

Nazlat Bāwīţ is a populated place in Asyut, Egypt. It has an elevation of 41 meters above sea level. It is also known as Nazlat Bawit, Nazlat Bāwīţ, Nazlet Bawit, Nazlet Bâwît. Information correct as at Thursday 19th January 2012.

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Nazlat Bāwīţ Images

Images are sourced within 20km of lat/long (27.53333/30.71667).

Soldiers, Tomb of Ahmose, Amarna The Nobles' Tombs in the northern cliffs of Amarna are some of the best preserved and most rewarding features surviving at the site of Akhetaten. The decoration is better preserved on the whole and reveals much about life during the Amarnan revolution.

Tell el Amarna is the site of something unique in Egypt's history, the brand new capital city by the 'heretic' pharaoh Amenophis IV, better known by the name Akhenaten. Today little remains of the ancient city beyond its foundations (largely hidden amidst the sand dunes), but its significance makes it one of the country's most important archaeological sites.

Akhenaten's reign is marked by a radical break with Egypt's ancient religion, the pharaoh abandoned the multitude of traditional gods in favour of a single deity, the Aten, the life giving sun-disc. A new city was built on a desert site, chosen for its proximity to a geographical feature that appeared to enfold the rising sun, and established to cement Egypt's revolution away from the priests and cult centre of Thebes. The city was named 'Akhetaten' and served as the cult centre of the pharoah's new religion with himself as the chief intermediary of the new god. Akhenaten is often celebrated as one of history's earliest monotheistic rulers. 

The city had a short life, as did Akhenaten's new religion, with the traditional order and power base restored following his death under the reign of his son Tutankhaten (better known as Tutankhamun, the name he adopted after abandoning the Atenist religion). The site was plundered for materials over the following decades and little remains visible beyond the tombs carved into the nearby cliffs. 

The palaces and the once great temple of Aten have all but disappeared, though two columns of the nearby small temple have been reconstructed in recent years. The desolate nature of the site has however preserved much of the city's layout, since unlike most ancient Egyptian settlements it remained uninhabited over the millennia.

For more on this intriguing site see below:-
<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna" rel="nofollow">en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna</a>
Soldiers, Tomb of Ahmose, Amarna
The Nobles' Tombs in the northern cliffs of Amarna are some of the best preserved and most rewarding features surviving at the site of Akhetaten. The decoration is better preserved on the whole and reveals much about life during the Amarnan revolution. Tell el Amarna is the site of something unique in Egypt's history, the brand new capital city by the 'heretic' pharaoh Amenophis IV, better known by the name Akhenaten. Today little remains of the ancient city beyond its foundations (largely hidden amidst the sand dunes), but its significance makes it one of the country's most important archaeological sites. Akhenaten's reign is marked by a radical break with Egypt's ancient religion, the pharaoh abandoned the multitude of traditional gods in favour of a single deity, the Aten, the life giving sun-disc. A new city was built on a desert site, chosen for its proximity to a geographical feature that appeared to enfold the rising sun, and established to cement Egypt's revolution away from the priests and cult centre of Thebes. The city was named 'Akhetaten' and served as the cult centre of the pharoah's new religion with himself as the chief intermediary of the new god. Akhenaten is often celebrated as one of history's earliest monotheistic rulers. The city had a short life, as did Akhenaten's new religion, with the traditional order and power base restored following his death under the reign of his son Tutankhaten (better known as Tutankhamun, the name he adopted after abandoning the Atenist religion). The site was plundered for materials over the following decades and little remains visible beyond the tombs carved into the nearby cliffs. The palaces and the once great temple of Aten have all but disappeared, though two columns of the nearby small temple have been reconstructed in recent years. The desolate nature of the site has however preserved much of the city's layout, since unlike most ancient Egyptian settlements it remained uninhabited over the millennia. For more on this intriguing site see below:- en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amarna
Ägypten 1999 (544) Flug von Luxor nach Kairo Irgendwo über Ägypten
Ägypten 1999 (544) Flug von Luxor nach Kairo
Irgendwo über Ägypten
Tombs at Meir
Tombs at Meir
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir
Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir
Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind the tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind this tomb.
Tomb of Pepy-Ankh and Ny-Ankh Pepy at Meir
Macquarie University's Professor Naguib Kanawati expounds on the story behind this tomb.
Stela U For the hieroglyphics readers among you.
Stela U
For the hieroglyphics readers among you.
Tuna el Gebel - Astronomical ceiling This painted ceiling is one of the few to show astronomical themes.
Tuna el Gebel - Astronomical ceiling
This painted ceiling is one of the few to show astronomical themes.
Investigating Hermopolis At the Temple of Domitianus. There is a royal cartouche on that rock but it is upside down, and hence so is Ilona.
Investigating Hermopolis
At the Temple of Domitianus. There is a royal cartouche on that rock but it is upside down, and hence so is Ilona.
Ilona points out the Great Palace
Ilona points out the Great Palace
Tomb of Meryra, Amarna Bianca gives her presentation inside tomb of Meryra, Amarna.
Tomb of Meryra, Amarna
Bianca gives her presentation inside tomb of Meryra, Amarna.
Walking from Stone Village A 20-minute walk to and from the bus through the desert.
Walking from Stone Village
A 20-minute walk to and from the bus through the desert.
Anna Stevens, Egypt Exploration Society Field director at the Stone Village excavation
Anna Stevens, Egypt Exploration Society
Field director at the Stone Village excavation
Stone village excavation, Amarna Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Stone village excavation, Amarna
Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Stone village excavation, Amarna Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Stone village excavation, Amarna
Anna gives the group a guided tour of recent finds.
Crossing the Nile on the way to Amarna Our driver Mohammed waits for the ferry to cross.
Crossing the Nile on the way to Amarna
Our driver Mohammed waits for the ferry to cross.
Tuna el Gebel - above the animal galleries
Tuna el Gebel - above the animal galleries
Captain of the Nile ferry II
Captain of the Nile ferry II
Show me another place!

What 3 Words

///aground.mothballs.beekeepers. Near Dayrūţ, Asyut

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Nearby Amenities

Located within 500m of 27.53333,30.71667
Power: tower
Lat/Long: 27.5291424/30.7149196
Power: tower
Lat/Long: 27.5321824/30.7132513
The data included in this document is from www.openstreetmap.org. The data is made available under ODbL.
 

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